10 Strange Stories About Our Odd Holiday Traditions And Beliefs

The Lisdoonvarna Matchmaking Festival has it all: Parents would bring their children together at social gatherings, sporting events and musical evenings — and all being well, courtships would blossom. The opening of the West Clare Railway in meant Lisdoonvarna increased in popularity as a tourist destination and the matchmaking tradition grew. With the harvest safely in and September being the peak holiday month, many bachelor farmers began to flock to Lisdoonvarna for a spa town vacation — and in search of a wife. Meet the Man Himself While the festival has moved into the 21st century, Willie still believes in the old fashioned method of round the table talks with couples and getting the passion flowing by getting them dancing together. His passion is to help hopeful singles, of all ages and nationalities, find a life partner and have a lot of fun on the way. This was the nineteenth century, and houses had no electricity or running water.

Séamus Devane (b. 1923)

But the character of August is better epitomised by its Irish name: It was one of the major Celtic holidays, sometimes heralding up to 15 days of fairs, markets, wrestling contests and matchmaking. A brooch bearing a Celtic design. Like most Celtic festivals, it anticipates an event. Celtic gods were a rather fiery bunch, much given to unpredicatable temper tantrums.

Lugh was no exception and was known to show his anger in violent late summer storms that could wreck delicate crops just before they were gathered.

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As such it plays a valuable part in protecting us from alien cultures! Heavy drinker, 35, Cork area. Donegal man, 50, in desperate need of a ride. Must have own car and be willing to travel. Optimistic Mayo man, 35, seeks a blonde 20 year old double-jointed super model, who owns her own brewery and has an open-minded twin sister. Following a sad recent loss, teetotal Tipperary man, 53, seeks replacement Mammy. Must like biscuits and answer to the name Minnie.

This is the official blurb for what is now a six week festival and for the last matchmaker, Willie Daly who runs a riding school sic near Ennistymon. The town developed into a tourist centre as early as the middle of the 18th-century when a top Limerick surgeon discovered the beneficial effects of its mineral waters.

People travelled from near and far to bathe in, and drink, the mineral waters. Rich in iron, sulphur and magnesium, the waters gave relief from the symptoms of certain diseases including rheumatism and glandular fever. The Spa Hotel was the centre around which the village developed.

40 Weird Facts About Monarchies

In Sephardi synagogues the whole congregation sits for Kaddish, except: In Ashkenazi synagogues, the custom varies. Very commonly, in both Orthodox and Reform congregations, everyone stands; but in some especially many Conservative and Hasidic synagogues, most of the congregants sit. Sometimes, a distinction is made between the different forms of Kaddish, or each congregant stands or sits according to his or her own custom.

This is the Lisdoonvarna Matchmaking Festival – the biggest event of its kind in Europe and part of the rich tradition of rural Ireland. A chance to gather and celebrate life, love, good music and great times!

The Celts, who lived 2, years ago in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom and northern France, celebrated their new year on November 1. This day marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark, cold winter, a time of year that was often associated with human death. Celts believed that on the night before the new year, the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead became blurred.

On the night of October 31 they celebrated Samhain, when it was believed that the ghosts of the dead returned to earth. In addition to causing trouble and damaging crops, Celts thought that the presence of the otherworldly spirits made it easier for the Druids, or Celtic priests, to make predictions about the future. For a people entirely dependent on the volatile natural world, these prophecies were an important source of comfort and direction during the long, dark winter.

To commemorate the event, Druids built huge sacred bonfires, where the people gathered to burn crops and animals as sacrifices to the Celtic deities. When the celebration was over, they re-lit their hearth fires, which they had extinguished earlier that evening, from the sacred bonfire to help protect them during the coming winter. One quarter of all the candy sold annually in the U. In the course of the four hundred years that they ruled the Celtic lands, two festivals of Roman origin were combined with the traditional Celtic celebration of Samhain.

September 2019

Share5 Shares Even though we think of traditions as customs that never change, nothing could be further from the truth. But either way, some of our most cherished holiday traditions have dark, wild stories behind them. When Irish immigrants were trying to make ends meet in the US, they ate beef brisket and cabbage because they were the cheapest foods available.

Matchmaking is an Irish tradition that’s as old as time. It began in Lisdoonvarna when visiting gentry came to ‘take the waters’ at this spa town and looked to match their .

Like most Celtic festivals, it anticipates an event. Celtic gods were a rather fiery bunch, much given to unpredicatable temper tantrums. Lugh was no exception and was known to show his anger in violent late summer storms that could wreck delicate crops just before they were gathered. So showing him respect, making sacrifices to him, or simply distracting him was called for.

If his needs were completely satisfied, he would let them have a bountiful harvest. Dance, music, art and poetry featured in this process, for Lugh was outstandingly gifted and skillful.

10 Strange Stories About Our Odd Holiday Traditions And Beliefs

Description The scattered seaside fishing village of Doolin County Clare is celebrated as the home of traditional Irish music and continues this rich and nourishing heritage today. Standing at the midway point of the Wild Atlantic Way, it is surrounded by the Burren , the Cliffs of Moher and the Aran Islands and is a nearby neighbour of Lisdoonvarna, famed for its annual matchmaking festival. Synge, George Bernard Shaw and the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas, and today welcomes and inspires visitors, surfers and musicians from around the world.

Boat trips to the Cliffs of Moher set sail daily from Doolin pier but the village itself offers a commanding view of the wild and wonderful Atlantic Ocean, together with a slice of rural Irish life.

Matchmaking is one of Ireland’s oldest traditions. “Babhdóir” is the Irish word for matchmaker. The busiest time of year for the matchmaker was during “Shrovetide”, which was the marrying season in .

They tend to take strength- and toughness-based characteristics, often being either a Mighty Glacier or a Lightning Bruiser , but rarely a Fragile Speedster or Glass Cannon. They tend to wield axes , as a kind of ancient waraxe called the labrys was strongly associated with the Minotaur’s legendary home of Crete, and no self-respecting labyrinth level is complete without one of these as a Boss Battle.

Mostly carnivorous and man-eating , despite having an herbivore’s head, as the original Minotaur was explicitly a man-eater. The Greek myth of the man-eating Minotaur , specifically, was the Trope Maker in western culture, and has directly or indirectly inspired most of the examples below. An interesting note is that the classical Minotaur of Greek, Etruscan and Roman myth, besides being an unique figure instead of a whole species of beings , was also depicted as an otherwise normal human with the head of a bull.

The concept of depicting minotaurs as having bovine hooves instead of human legs and feet is something that developed or at least became prevalent in relatively recent fiction.

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The traditional date is the night of July August 1, but modern convenience has moved the date to whichever Sunday is nearest. Looking north from Carrowkeel Megalithic Cemetery. Ben Bulben is the long flat mountain in the upper left. In agricultural terms, the weather has been good enough for months that the crops have ripened i.

Matchmaking The tradition of matchmaking reaches back a long way into the history of West Cork and its people. At a time when love matches were not the fashion and compulsory marriages – locally referred to with a fine turn of accuracy as ‘must marriages’ – unknown, the made match was generally in vogue.

Society Lisdoonvarna in County Clare attracts thousands of visitors in pursuit of the nightlife, looking for marriage and seeking the curative properties of the local spa water. In the old days visitors to Lisdoonvarna in County Clare were Tipperary farmers. While they still visit, so do thousands of young people from all over Ireland who come to dance, drink and sing.

A large number of people also come to drink or bathe in the sulphur manganese baths. At its peak in , 15, people took the waters in Lisdoonvarna. While its popularity has waned since, it still has devotees, especially amongst the clergy. One priest finds the baths and waters are a great help for rheumatism.

NEW ORLEANS

Weddings were always community affairs joining not only two people, but two families. Thus, it was the duty of the two families and other villagers to make the occasion as festive and grand as possible. It is not surprising then that wedding festivities were rich in collective creativity and expression. Lithuanian wedding rituals followed rigidly fixed forms. At the end of the 19th century and early 20th centuries, weddings consisted of three separate stages: Each one of these stages had strictly defined traditional elements which all participants observed.

Feb 04,  · A Matchmaker and a Festival Keep an Irish Tradition Alive Image Willie Daly, a matchmaker, on his farm in the western county of Clare, estimates that .

Copperplate Ceili Band The arrival of a new ceili band happens rarely enough on the set dancing scene that it generates a stir of excitement. A band needs more than luck to play at these events; they have to make great music and the Copperplate does that with ease. The three members of the band, Enda McGlone, Brian Ward and Eamonn Donnelly, on box, banjo and piano, make music that is both fun to dance to and thoroughly traditional. They start each figure in perfect unison, play a mixture of familiar and unusual tunes with frequent and effortless changes, and waste no time between figures and sets.

The Copperplate Ceili Band was formed in December Two of the musicians, Brian Ward and Eamonn Donnelly, had been playing in pubs for years as a two-piece band on guitar and piano.

Appearance Is Ideology

However, Chinese weddings now incorporate both traditional Chinese customs and Western wedding customs. Due to the wide range of ethnicities and the vast landmass, wedding ceremonies can vary for different backgrounds, cultures and regions. This is completely understandable since most Chinese families now have only one child, and this means family members treat their child as if the world revolved around them.

When it comes to a wedding, we think it is not only the joyful union of the newlyweds, but also a long term union of two families.

The Irish Matchmaker Willie Daly is the last of the traditional Irish ‘matchmakers’, matching lonely couples from around the world at the Lisdoonvarna matchmaking festival. Now his daughters are taking over the business, run from his farm in County Clare, in the west of Ireland.

Tell your friends about From-Ireland. Matchmaking The tradition of matchmaking reaches back a long way into the history of West Cork and its people. It was the belief of the people that matches were made in heaven even if some of them later produced a semblance of hell on earth. Negotiations were set afoot, and the matchmaking wrangle was normally carried out in a special room in one of the pubs in town with only the go-between in attendance to put forward split-the-difference suggestions at the right times and in the correct places.

The farm duly walked, further negotiations began, and if the fortune was finally fixed and the transfer of the place from the father to the son, agreed, then the match was made. Many a match was not made, however, because twenty pounds, sometimes less than that, was between the bargainers and neither side would give way in an era when matchmaking differed only in species from a purchase or sale at the local fair.

Both were based on bargaining and both depended on whether or not the bargain -makers reached a final agreement. The marriage ceremony was, in the eyes of the neighbours, the least important part of the occasion. If everything was lavish it was a dacent wedding. A honeymoon-was unknown in the country at that time. Gone is the matchmaking, gone the matchmaker. Gone, too,is the country wedding as we used to know it.

Whatever reservations one might have about the matchmaking only fond memories can remain of the country wedding. With its full and plenty, its dancing and songs and general merriment, a dacent country wedding was an event to remember for the rest of your life.

Inis Mór (Inishmore)

Renowned artists from Ireland and the Celtic Diaspora coming together for a unique fusion of our shared culture on the intimate setting of the Aran island of Inis Mor. Seated concerts and readings, dance floored Ceilis and some of the best pub sessions you will ever have the pleasure of taking part in will create three days of unforgettable Celtic passion. In the past, people came to the Islands for their honeymoons.

It is recognized as one of the largest collections of its kind in Western Europe. It features folklore recorded from across the 32 counties of Ireland, in both Irish and English. In recognition of the ongoing decline of the Irish language, and the likely loss of tradition associated with this process, the Commission directed considerable resources to recording Irish-language tradition bearers in the early years of its operation.

It also recorded significant amounts of material in Scots Gaelic and Manx. The Main Manuscript Collection consists of 2, bound and paginated volumes – approximately , pages of material. These collectors were thoroughly familiar with the dialect and lore of their respective districts.

Matchmaker: die Tradition der Heiratsvermittlung in Irland


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